FAITH QUEST

This lesson plan is copyrighted and belongs to the Kirk of Kildaire Presbyterian,

Cary North Carolina. It may be used for non-profit uses only.

NOAH AND THE FLOOD

 

 

The story of Noah and the Ark covers four chapters of Genesis (6-9).  This is too much to “read” or have the kids read, so particular parts of the story will be highlighted in various workshops.

 

CREATION STATION

 

Scripture:  Genesis 8:19-9:17 (This is the part of the story that describes the animals leaving the ark and God’s promise to Noah.  It also contains the passages that tell the Covenant with Noah.)

 

Memory Verse/Key Verse:  Genesis 9:12-13, “God said, ‘This is the sign of the covenant that I make between me and you and every living creature that is with you, for all future generations; I have set my bow in the clouds, and it shall be a sign of the covenant between me and the earth.’” (New Revised Standard Version)

 

Concepts:                       God is amazing.

                                                God makes promises.

                                                God communicates with people.

 

Objectives:   Students will create the scene of the animals leaving the ark and a rainbow.  This will help ingrain the story of Noah in each child.  Students will also examine the meaning of covenant and how they are to respond to God’s covenant in the artistic process of creating a rainbow for their scene.

 

Procedure:

1.  Welcome the kids.  Make sure that everyone is in the right classroom!  Kids will either already have name tags on, or will make a name tag as they arrive.  Make sure that you know everyone’s name and greet the students individually.

 

2.  Start the “lesson time” with prayer.  Ask for volunteers, but plan on praying yourself.  Be sure to thank God for each person there and ask God to be with you as you learn about the promises God makes and help you to understand how you are part of those promises.

 

3.  Recount a brief story of Noah and the Ark.  Have the kids answer questions to help you tell the story (for example - Why did God tell Noah to build an Ark?  Who was going to be on the Ark?  How big was the Ark? etc.).  Younger children will need a story that is simpler, older kids’ version can contain more details.  You might want to use Bible Stories for the Young (see reference section at end of lesson)

 

Be sure to spend the most time on the scripture passages referenced above.  Have the kids use their Bibles and locate the above reference.  They can either follow along as you read that part of the story or take turns reading verses for the class.  Younger kids might not be able to all read, but they should be encouraged to find the passage and follow along.  Their shepherds can help the class use their Bibles. Highlight parts of the scripture that reinforce the lesson concepts (listed at beginning of this lesson plan) that are demonstrated in these passages.

 

For example, be sure to highlight when the scripture says that God spoke with Noah and other things God did to communicate with Noah.  You may need to discuss how people can communicate other than by talking.

 

It is also important to convey a sense of amazement and wonder at the things God did/said/promised.  The kids need to sense that God is amazing.

 

4.  What is a covenant? Spend some time talking about what covenant means (a relationship between two parties where each promises to do or be something to one another) and the kind of covenant God made with Noah and all the people.  Talk about whether they think God still makes covenants and, if so, what are they?  Tell the kids that they are going to create a scene with a rainbow that will contain something they can ‘covenant’ with God in their own lives (to love people, help those in need, read the bible, get along with siblings, respect other peoples differences, etc.).

 

5. Begin art project. Tell the children that you would like them to remember the story of the ark and God’s covenant by making a picture of the arrival of the ark on land and the animals leaving.  A rainbow should be across the top and their covenant will be written on it.

 

Have 12x18 white paper, smaller brown, yellow and pink construction paper, markers and paste available. Use rubber stamps of animals. Some children may stamp pairs of animals leaving the ark.  With magic markers, details and a large rainbow can be added. 

 

Write a covenant. Those children who are capable are to write their covenant across the rainbow ­ younger children will need assistance in doing this ­ either write their covenant on scrap paper and have them copy it, or write it for them. What do they promise to do ­ for God, for their parents, for a friend?

 

6. Clean up!  Involve all kids in this so that you will have time to share together in the closing.  You may want to have a prearranged signal or sound for clean up and tell them at beginning of art project what that will be - perhaps giving them a 5 minute warning and then the final clean up notice to allow those who need a bit more warning that they need to complete whatever they are working on.

 

Reflection Time: 

The shepherds will pass out the children’s journals.  The children should spend a few minutes reflecting upon the morning’s lesson ­ what did they learn, what did they enjoy, what was their covenant.  Some children will need help getting started.  Some may just want to draw a picture or copy the Key Verse.  The shepherds will collect the journals, be sure to leave enough time for the closing activity.

 

Closing: 

Prayer ­

Older students:  To end the workshop you might want to include all the kids’ covenants in a closing prayer.  You could form a circle and ask each child to read their covenant in their rainbow as you go around the circle.  Be sure that the kids know it is okay to NOT share their covenant.

 

You could also have them read/recite the key verse with you (it is long and should be printed on banner/board, large enough for all to read or on slips of paper that each child is given to glue on the back of their picture).

 

Younger students:  The younger kids might be willing to share what they have used as their covenant, but it might be better if you, the workshop leader, note some of their covenants as you go around the room helping and incorporate those in a prayer at the close.

 

This age group might enjoy sharing which animal they enjoyed drawing/stamping the most and why.  You could ask them to name one thing about the Noah story that they think shows that God is amazing.

 

No matter what you choose to do as a closing, be sure to end with prayer and affirm your joy in having each student there.  Make sure they know they are a part of God’s promise that was made as long ago as Noah’s time and that God made other promises in the Bible that they will learn about as they continue to grow in their faith and knowledge of the Bible, God and Jesus.

 

Tidy and Dismissal ­ Ask the children for help with any clean-up needed. The Shepherd should collect name-tags and journals.

 

If there is extra time, you or the shepherds should have some Bible puzzle or activity sheets that the kids can work on until the Faith Quest hour is over and parents arrive.

 

Teacher preparation in advance:

1.      Prepare an opening prayer in case nobody volunteers to pray.

2.      Prepare a few samples showing different techniques the kids can use to create their scenes, but remember, the samples are NOT to show them what their scene should look like - each child should be encouraged to create their own scene depicting the animals leaving the ark and their rainbow with their covenant.

3.      Prepare all the materials you will need for the creation process.  Think about how you want to distribute the materials so that everyone will have the opportunity to see, feel and experience all the choices.  You will also need to have some means of labeling their creation - that seems self explanatory, but it is very important!

4.      Decide how you want to close the lesson.  Prepare a prayer or use one of the group suggestions above.  Closing with a song would also be good.  The song “God is so Good” would be a possibility or others about God’s love or promises.

 

Materials:

12”x18” White paper for background

markers

animal stamps

construction paper ­ brown, yellow and pink

paste/glue

Bibles

Paper strip with Key verse printed on it (?)

 

References:

Year One Lesson set from St. Elmo’s Choir, Noah and the Ark by Steve Lindsley

 

Bible Stories for the Young, by Grindley & Barger, page 25 (Eva Perry Library, J220.9)